LATINOS & THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

Latino Experiences with Crime

HomicideRates

Latinos—and particularly young Latinos—face disproportionate risks of experiencing violent crime. Latinos under 30 are almost three times as likely to be homicide victims as white people the same age. Latinos are more likely than average to be threatened or attacked with a gun. And when Latinos report crimes, the report is less likely to lead to an arrest than the same crimes do when the victims are white. Despite these disparities, the research on Latino victimization is somewhat sparse. Until recently, studies focused more on perpetrators than on victims, and on white and black victims to the exclusion of other groups. Government data sometimes omitted “Hispanic” as a category, making it difficult to examine how crime has affected Latinos over time. In the past two decades, though, more has been documented about the rates and consequences of victimization of Latinos.

This resource site summarizes research about Latinos as victims of crimes in California and nationwide....more.

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

The Tomás Rivera Policy Institute, a university research center with the mission to address the challenges and opportunities of demographic diversity in the 21st century global city, has produced these digital publications using the USC Media Curator, an online publishing platform designed to bring together innovative research from across the University of Southern California and beyond. This project curates research on Latinos and the criminal justice system, focusing on  Latino experiences with crimedisparities in the system, and Latino public opinion & perception. This project was supported by Californians for Safety and JusticeAdditionally, Californians for Safety and Justice released in June 2014 a comprehensive report on existing data about Latinos, crime and the justice system, including recommendations. Click here to learn more. 

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